Thursday, May 5, 2011

EPA: “Japanese Nuclear Emergency: Radiation Monitoring”

“Japanese Nuclear Emergency: Radiation Monitoring”
by the Environmental Protection Agency

“Due to the consistent decrease in radiation levels across the country associated with the Japanese nuclear incident, EPA will update the daily data summary page only when new data are posted. Historical daily data summaries will continue to be accessible from this webpage. After a thorough data review showing declining radiation levels related to the Japanese nuclear incident, EPA has returned to the routine RadNet sampling and analysis process for precipitation, drinking water and milk.

As always, EPA's RadNet system of more than 100 stationary monitors will continue to provide EPA scientists near-real-time data on the slightest fluctuations in background radiation levels. Due to the consistently decreasing radiation levels, EPA is evaluating the need to continue operating the additional air monitors deployed in response to the Japan nuclear incident. EPA's will continue to analyze air filters and cartridges from all air monitors as they arrive at the laboratory and will post the data as available..

In accordance with normal RadNet protocol, EPA will be analyzing milk and drinking water samples on a quarterly basis and precipitation samples as part of a monthly composite. The next round of milk and drinking water sampling will take place in approximately three months. It is important to note that all of the radiation levels detected by RadNet monitors and sampling have been very low, are well below any level of public health concern, and continue to decrease overtime. EPA continues to work with federal partners to monitor the situation in Japan and stands prepared to accelerate radiation sampling and analysis if the need arises. Data will continue to be available on EPA's public website.

May 3, 2011: Today, EPA released new data for drinking water, precipitation and milk. Results from one drinking water and two precipitation samples detected low levels of radioactive material consistent with estimated releases from the damaged nuclear reactors. These detections were expected and the levels detected are far below levels of public health concern. To view the most recent sampling data, go to http://www.epa.gov/japan2011/rert/radnet-sampling-data.html.

April 28, 2011: As of 9:00 am (EDT) EPA's RadNet radiation air monitors across the U.S. show typical fluctuations in background radiation levels. The levels detected are far below levels of concern. Today, EPA also released new data for drinking water. Both drinking water results were non-detects for iodine-131.To view the most recent sampling and monitoring data, go to http://www.epa.gov/japan2011/rert/radnet-sampling-data.html.

View previous daily data summaries:

    * April: http://www.epa.gov/japan2011/data-updates-april.html

    * March: http://www.epa.gov/japan2011/data-updates-march.html

Due to the consistent decrease in radiation levels across the country associated with the Japanese nuclear incident, EPA will update the daily data summary page only when new data are posted. Historical daily data summaries will continue to be accessible from this webpage."
- http://www.sott.net/
A caveat: Obviously the EPA is a department within the Federal government. As experience has taught me, for countless reasons, I believe absolutely nothing the Federal government proclaims, and it will be a very cold day in hell that I post any of their lies propaganda nonsense  official "information." That said, the following site will provide you with accurate information regarding radiation levels.- CP
Baseline Surface Radiation Network: "Because of the important role radiation plays in the climate system, the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) was established to provide a worldwide network to continuously measure radiative fluxes at the Earth's surface. Many of these stations began operation in 1992 and each year more stations are added to the network. These stations provide data for the calibration of the GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) Project and other satellite-based measurements of radiative fluxes. BSRN data are also used to validate radiative flux models. About 40 stations in contrasting climatic zones, covering a latitude range from 80°N to 90°S (see station maps) are providing data to the BSRN archive located at the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) in Bremerhaven, Germany. In 2004, BSRN was designated as the global surface radiation network for the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The BSRN stations also contribute to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW)."

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