Friday, May 11, 2018

"The Status Quo Is Deathly Boring"; "Killing Our Dreams"

"The Status Quo Is Deathly Boring"
by Paul Rosenberg

"Most young people know nothing but the world as it is. Their teachers assure them that this is the best form of human organization, all authority agrees, and their parents toe the party line. The system is geared to keep them shuffling forward quietly unto death.

What a waste.
What a crime.
What a bore.

“Live dangerously and you live right.” This line comes from the great author Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and he was ever so correct. The life of meek obedience is a sin against the self. It is a surrender of mind and passion. It’s a half life at best. But unquestioning compliance is the easy way. It’s what the system is designed to extract from you. It’s what school trains you for, it’s what corporations expect of you, and it’s what government demands. In the end, compliance is extorted from you by manipulation and violence. Everyone does it, so you’d better do it. And if you don’t, you’ll get in a lot of trouble. We’ve all experienced this, but in terror of authority, we fail to call it by its true name.

And yet Goethe is correct. If you want to live as an energized, expansive, open, and honest being, you have no choice but to live dangerously… because the system has decreed real living to be dangerous. Only what services the machine is “safe.” And it wasn’t just Goethe who thought this. I want you to see the thoughts of other men and women on this subject:

"The meaning of life is that it is to be lived, and it is not to be 
traded and conceptualized and squeezed into a pattern of systems."
– Bruce Lee 

"Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered – 
either by themselves or by others."
– Mark Twain

"The tragedy of life is what dies in the hearts and souls of people while they live."
– Albert Einstein

Life shrinks or expands according to one’s courage.
– Anais Nin

"Life is a process of becoming, a combination of states we have to go through. Where people fail is that they wish to elect a [condition] and remain in it. This is a kind of death."
– Anais Nin

"When you are inspired by some great purpose, some extraordinary project, all your thoughts break your bonds; your mind transcends limitations, your consciousness expands in every direction, and you find yourself in a new, great and wonderful world. Dormant forces, faculties and talents become alive, and you discover yourself to be a greater person by far than you ever dreamed yourself to be."
– Patanjali (2nd century BC)

"The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle."
– Albert Einstein, "Mein Weltbild"

"To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all."
– Oscar Wilde

"All theory is against the freedom of the will, all experience for it."
– Samuel Johnson

"Conscience is deceived by the social."
– Simone Weil, "The Great Beast"

The secret is that only that which can destroy itself is truly alive.
– Carl Jung, "Psychology and Alchemy"

Obedience Is Boring: To obey is to turn off your mind. To obey is to live someone else’s life. To obey is to cease existing. But once you turn to the taskmaster and say “No,” you turn on. Your life enlarges, expands, and becomes a force in the universe. Five years later you’ll look back and be amazed at the scales that fell from your eyes.

Fear is a brain hack. Fear is the great enemy. Fear is deathTo love is to live. To live is to open your life to expansion, to deep satisfaction, and to love.

Please reread the quotes above. Turn and face the fear. Tell it to go to hell. Start living your way. Make your own mistakes. Repair them. Live and love.”
Related:
"Killing Our Dreams"
by Paulo Coelho

"The first symptom of the process of our killing our dreams is the lack of time. The busiest people I have known in my life always have time enough to do everything. Those who do nothing are always tired and pay no attention to the little amount of work they are required to do. They complain constantly that the day is too short. The truth is, they are afraid to fight the Good Fight.

The second symptom of the death of our dreams lies in our certainties. Because we don’t want to see life as a grand adventure, we begin to think of ourselves as wise and fair and correct in asking so little of life. We look beyond the walls of our day-to-day existence, and we hear the sound of lances breaking, we smell the dust and the sweat, and we see the great defeats and the fire in the eyes of the warriors. But we never see the delight, the immense delight in the hearts of those who are engaged in the battle. For them, neither victory nor defeat is important; what’s important is only that they are fighting the Good Fight.

And, finally, the third symptom of the passing of our dreams is peace. Life becomes a Sunday afternoon; we ask for nothing grand, and we cease to demand anything more than we are willing to give. In that state, we think of ourselves as being mature; we put aside the fantasies of our youth, and we seek personal and professional achievement. We are surprised when people our age say that they still want this or that out of life. But really, deep in our hearts, we know that what has happened is that we have renounced the battle for our dreams – we have refused to fight the Good Fight.

When we renounce our dreams and find peace, we go through a short period of tranquility. But the dead dreams begin to rot within us and to infect our entire being. We become cruel to those around us, and then we begin to direct this cruelty against ourselves. That’s when illnesses and psychoses arise. What we sought to avoid in combat – disappointment and defeat – come upon us because of our cowardice. And one day, the dead, spoiled dreams make it difficult to breathe, and we actually seek death. It’s death that frees us from our certainties, from our work, and from that terrible peace of our Sunday afternoons."

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